Heritage

Heritage

A timeless material

Grand Antique marble from Aubert has been absent from the market for about 70 years. It's extracted in the Valley of the river Lez, Aubert in the southeast of Saint-Girons in the Ariege department (France).

This prestigious marble is black and white, and the intense shades of colour create a very defined contrast that is unique and rare. The dating of the formation of this tectonic breach, formed by clasts of black limestone and pure white calcite, is identified at the end of the Cretaceous period following the corrugation that affected the Northern Pyrenean area about 65 million years ago.

The Grand Antique, once known as "Celtic marble", has been used widely in many masterpieces of Roman and Byzantine architecture. Among others, the most significant is Hagia Sophia in Instanbul. After this period of this intense activity, the quarry was abandoned, and the remaining blocks were used to decorate the Basilica of San Pietro, Santa Maria Maggiore, the Basilica of Santa Cecilia in Rome and the Basilica of San Marco in Venice. It was reopened for a brief period in the 19th Century. It currently represents one of the most representative sources of our activity.

Grand Antique is a black and white marble that is only extracted from the quarry in the Valley of the river Lez, Aubert in the southeast of Saint-Girons in the Ariege department ( France ). The intense shades of colour create a very defined contrast that is unique and rare. Its origins date back to approximatively 65 million years ago. It was once known as "Celtic marble” and has been used widely in many masterpieces of Roman and Byzantine architecture. Among others, the most significant is Hagia Sophia in Instanbul. After this period of this intense activity, the quarry was abandoned, and the remaining blocks were used to decorate the Basilica of San Pietro, Santa Maria Maggiore, the Basilica of Santa Cecilia in Rome and the Basilica of San Marco in Venice. It was reopened for a brief period in the 19th Century. It currently represents one of the most representative sources of our activity.

Grand Antique was Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann's favourite material for his decorative art of fireplaces.

There are many iconic places where you can admire the use of this prestigious material. For instance, Joseph Napoleon's Tomb and the massive columns in the Church of Saint Louis at the Invalides of Paris are made of Grand Antique marble. You can also find it at the base of the Statue of St. Peter in Westminster Cathedral in London, the columns of Tarbes Cathedral, and the Salon of Diana in the Palace of Versailles in Paris. (The Bagneres de Bigorre Museum also houses a beautiful table measuring 5 meters long and 1 meter and 30 centimetres wide made up of two polished symmetrical slabs forming an open book offered by the Grande Post de Toulouse in 2007.) This highly decorative material is mainly suitable for making columns, inlays, fireplaces, vases, table tops, floors, wall coverings and other architectural decorations.